National Establishment Time-Series (NETS)

Categories: Longitudinal database; regional industries and economies

Overview: Walls & Associates converts Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) archival establishment data into a time-series database of establishment information, the National Establishment Time-Series (NETS) Database. The NETS Database provides longitudinal data on various dynamics of the U.S. economy that include establishment job creation and destruction, sales growth performance, survivability of business startups, mobility patterns, changes in primary markets, corporate affiliations that highlight M&A, and historical D&B credit and payment ratings.

Unit of Analysis: Establishment

Coverage: Business, non-profit and government establishments, sole proprietors

Size and Timeframe: 44.2 million unique business, non-profit and government establishments between 1990 and 2010

Form: Micro-level database

Key Data Elements:

  • Business establishments
  • Employment
  • Headquarter linkages
  • Relocation information
  • Estimated annual sales (firm-level)
  • National count of related establishments
  • Dun & Bradstreet Credit Score
  • Years active
  • Industry classification
  • Dun & Bradstreet PayDex scores
  • Type of establishment
  • Special indicators

Frequency: Annual update

Method: Annual “snapshots” of D&B’s proprietary establishment data are utilized to construct the NETS Database time-series. No establishments are deleted from the database; the “First Year” and “Last Year” are provided to indicate which are still active in 2010.

Access: Subscription

Potential Uses for Regional Analysis: The data provides access to analysis on the following topics:

  • What is the size and performance of specific markets over time and do we want to invest in them?
  • Do establishments that receive venture capital perform better than those that do not?
  • Product line forecasting.
  • How has a specific firm’s (or set of firms) market share changed over time?
  • Epidemiology studies of the links between industries and disease.
  • Who are the important employers in a region and who contributes most to the region’s growth?
  • Comparisons of large and small retail chains and their competition with independent stores.
  • What kinds of occupations are going to be in demand?
  • Business startup and failure analysis.
  • What kinds of linkages are there among businesses in your state?
  • What are the impacts of tax changes, environmental regulations, and educational performance on business location decisions?
  • Job creation and destruction at the industry level by establishment.
  • Does local ownership foster growth?
  • Economic development targeting.
  • How does public policy impact business performance?
  • Do business incubators foster business success and survival?

For Additional Information:

Print Friendly

2 Trackbacks

  1. [...] with a high share of jobs in science, technology, engineering and math using data from the National Establishment Time Series for 2010. Based on this, Hathaway measured the density of high-tech start-ups across 384 U.S. [...]

  2. [...] with a high share of jobs in science, technology, engineering and math using data from the National Establishment Time Series for 2010. Based on this, Hathaway measured the density of high-tech start-ups across 384 U.S. [...]